Psoriasis

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin.[6] These skin patches are typically reddryitchy, and scaly.[3] On people with darker skin the patches may be purple in colour.[9] Psoriasis varies in severity from small, localized patches to complete body coverage.[3] Injury to the skin can trigger psoriatic skin changes at that spot, which is known as the Koebner phenomenon.[10]

There are five main types of psoriasis: plaque, guttateinversepustular, and erythrodermic.[6] Plaque psoriasis, also known as psoriasis vulgaris, makes up about 90 percent of cases.[4] It typically presents as red patches with white scales on top.[4] Areas of the body most commonly affected are the back of the forearms, shins, navel area, and scalp.[4] Guttate psoriasis has drop-shaped lesions.[6] Pustular psoriasis presents as small non-infectious pus-filled blisters.[11] Inverse psoriasis forms red patches in skin folds.[6] Erythrodermic psoriasis occurs when the rash becomes very widespread, and can develop from any of the other types.[4]Fingernails and toenails are affected in most people with psoriasis at some point in time.[4] This may include pits in the nails or changes in nail color.[4]

Psoriasis is generally thought to be a genetic disease that is triggered by environmental factors.[3] In twin studiesidentical twins are three times more likely to be affected compared to non-identical twins. This suggests that genetic factors predispose to psoriasis.[4] Symptoms often worsen during winter and with certain medications, such as beta blockers or NSAIDs.[4] Infections and psychological stress can also play a role.[3][6]Psoriasis is not contagious.[4] The underlying mechanism involves the immune system reacting to skin cells.[4] Diagnosis is typically based on the signs and symptoms.[4]

There is no cure for psoriasis; however, various treatments can help control the symptoms.[4] These treatments include steroid creamsvitamin D3 cream, ultraviolet light and immune system suppressing medications, such as methotrexate.[6] About 75 percent of cases can be managed with creams alone.[4] The disease affects two to four percent of the population.[8] Men and women are affected with equal frequency.[6] The disease may begin at any age, but typically starts in adulthood.[5] Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk of psoriatic arthritislymphomascardiovascular diseaseCrohn’s disease and depression.[4] Psoriatic arthritis affects up to 30 percent of individuals with psoriasis.[11]

Oroville

Oroville is the county seat of Butte County, California, United States. The population was 15,506 at the 2010 census, up from 13,004 in the 2000 census. Oroville is considered the gateway to Lake Oroville and Feather River recreational areas. The city of Oroville has recently annexed two locations in South Oroville, areas A and B, which have a combined population of 2,725 people. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the population of the city to be 17,996 as of January 1, 2016, up 1,908 people or 11.9 percent since 2010. The Berry Creek Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California is headquartered here.

Oroville is located off of State Route 70, and is in close proximity to State Route 99, which connects Butte County with Interstate 5Chico, California is located about 25 minutes north of the city, and Sacramento lies about an hour south.

Oroville is situated at the base of the foothills on the banks of the Feather River where it flows out of the Sierra Nevada onto the flat floor of the Sacramento Valley. It was established as the head of navigation on the Feather River to supply gold miners during the California Gold Rush.

The town was originally called “Ophir City”, but the name was changed to Oroville when the first post office opened in 1854 (“oro” is “gold” in Spanish).[6] The City Of Oroville was incorporated on January 3, 1906.

Gold was found at Bidwell Bar, one of the first gold mining sites in California, bringing thousands of prospectors to the Oroville area seeking riches. Now inundated by the waters of enormous Lake Oroville, which was filled in 1968, Bidwell Bar is memorialized by the Bidwell Bar Bridge, an original remnant from the area and the first suspension bridge in California (California Historical Landmark #314). In the early 20th century the Western Pacific Railroad completed construction of the all-weather Feather River Canyon route through the Sierra Nevadas giving it the nickname of “The Feather River Route”. Oroville would serve as an important stop for the famous California Zephyr during its 20-year run. In 1983, this became a part of the Union Pacific Railroad as their Feather River Canyon Subdivision. A major highway, State Route 70, roughly parallels the railroad line winding through the canyon.